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Director Sharon Shattuck’s film PROJECT DAD is among a few documentary projects exploring the issue of transgender from different approaches.

This week Brainchild Films announced that musician Janet Jackson was set to serve as an executive producer on a documentary about transgendered people titled TRUTH, to be directed by Robert Jason. TRUTH will join a few other recent projects following transgendered subjects. Filmmaker Dan Hunt is currently in post-production on his film MR. ANGEL, an examination of trans porn star and lecturer Buck Angel. And the New York Times Op-Docs recently featured an excerpt from Sharon Shattuck’s film PROJECT DAD, about her transgendered parent. (Shattuck recently launched a Kickstarter campaign, which you can check out here.) Add that to the Sundance Channel’s show Transgeneration, and you might have the makings of a small trend.

Silverdocs released its conference agenda, which is stacked with a number of great panels and events. The festival, which runs June 18-24, will feature a keynote address from Jigar Mehta, one of the brains behind the interactive documentary/journalism project 18 DAYS IN EGYPT. Erica Ginsberg of Docs in Progress provided her own preview of the festival, which takes place in Silver Spring, MD, just outside of Washington, D.C.

The Sundance Institute and Cinereach this week announced the 15 projects to be recipients of a total of $200,000 in grant money. The doc projects selected were THE COMMISSIONER by Jarreth Merz about Ghana’s presidential elections; THE KILL TEAM by Dan Krauss about a U.S. soldier on trial for war crimes; and THE SHADOW WORLD by Johan Grimonprez about the arms industry.

The Sheffield Doc/Fest is set to begin in two days time, running June 13-17 in England. Basil Tsiokos of What Not to Doc graciously provided readers with an overview of the festival. On his list of films to keep an eye out for are GLASTOPIA by Lindsey Dryden and GYPSY BLOOD by Leo Maguire.

In this week’s Docutopia, Anthony Kaufman takes a look at a few of the films focusing on Egypt’s recent revolution, and specifically its geographic heart—Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Those in New York City can check out one of the films referenced by Kaufman, TAHRIR: LIBERATION SQUARE by Stefano Savona, during its June 11-17 theatrical run at the Maysles Cinema.

For those of you in New York City, the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) has scheduled a retrospective of the work of filmmaker Lourdes Portillo, scheduled to run June 22-30. The films are being co-presented with the Flaherty Seminar.

Christopher Campbell has this week’s theatrical releases, which include MARIA ABRAMOVIC: THE ARTIST IS PRESENT by Matthew Akers and PAUL WILLIAMS STILL ALIVE by Stephen Kessler. Campbell also got a chance to speak with Kessler and songwriter/tv personality Williams, you can check that out here.

Writing at the Center for Social Media blog, Lauren Donia breaks down the importance of blogging platform tumblr to filmmakers attempting to build an audience for their projects. In other news from the Center, Pat Aufderheide had a chat with the folks from Techdirt on fair use. You can check out a recap of the conversation here.

Filmmaker Ondi Timoner dropped her latest episode of the online show Bring Your Own Doc, featuring interviews with Rachel Loube, Jill Bauer, Ronna Gradus and Chris Kenneally.

The trend of remaking documentaries extended to the realm of musical theater this week, when Variety reported that producer David Sonenberg was remaking the 1996 Leon Gast doc WHEN WE WERE KINGS into a stage musical.

This year, the International Documentary Association (IDA) has partnered with the Games for Change festival, which runs June 18-20 at New York University’s Skirball Center. The nonprofit Games for Change facilitates the creation and distribution of social impact games that serve as critical tools in humanitarian and educational efforts.

At ITVS’s Beyond the Box, Rebecca Huval also provided a few routes that DIY film distributors can take. And Jon Reiss, director of the graffiti doc BOMB IT, has collected some excerpts from his class “Thinking Outside the Box Office,” about exploring new methods of film distribution. You can watch them on his YouTube channel here.

As always, anyone with tips or suggestions for the Memo can email them .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or tweet them to @GuerrillaFace. Thanks, and have a great week all.

  • Wail

    Hi Wayne,Yeah watching the soduim is, what I think, the first step in the right direction. You should at least feel your pressure in the ear going down by that. I would also recommend you to watch coffee and alcohol. I personally feel a correlation between my Meniere’s and Alcohol more than with coffee or salt. Let’s say, if I drink 2-3 beers on empty stomach (after work) I can bet that my ear is getting worse if not that night, than the next day. So, salt, coffee and alcohol. And smoke. Cigarette smoke is also well known to affect the ear.  About the ringing in the ear: Tinnitus is very difficult to treat. I personally don’t know of anything except   acupuncture. And that’s something, if you read my last article there, I am just trying out. Now with Acupuncture that’s one of these things: 1. You need a good Acupuncturer otherwise the symptoms will not improve 2. In traditional Chinese Medicine they treat Meniere’s with Acupuncture EVERY day   you can guess that this is something very unlikely achievable for us here. So, for the ringing but also for the overall improvement of your Meniere’s I would say find a good acupuncturer and try to create a short, frequent treatment. With that I mean   3 times for 1/2 weeks. I had 2 treatments and my dizziness attacks (I had for some reason 4-5 last week) disappeared and I feel less pressure in my ear. I do still have Tinnitus and hearing loss is pretty bad. But I am going to write an entry about that experience soon   Mate, good luck with that and let me know how you are going and write me your experiences!